Jan 27, 2022  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Common Course Numbering

To ease transfer of credits among the 34 community and technical colleges in Washington State, many courses are titled and numbered the same at all colleges and designated with an “&” (e.g. ENGL& 101 ). Common Course Numbering is designed to help you, the student, know that a course you have taken at one Washington school is the same at another Washington school and the course will transfer easily. Courses without an “&” still transfer under the Direct Transfer Agreement. If you have any questions, please contact the Admissions Office, (360) 538-4121.

Class Information

Learning at Grays Harbor College is delivered in a variety of class formats.

Face-to-Face: These courses are conducted in a traditional classroom with students required to attend in-person on- campus sessions.

Online: Courses are conducted entirely online and have no face-to-face requirement. All online courses use the CANVAS Learning Management Suite as the virtual classroom.

Hybrid: In these courses students are required to meet in person, as well as online. CANVAS, or another web-based tool is used for the online component.

ITV: Courses are taught via interactive television, typically consisting of video and audio transmission, allowing instructors and students to see, hear, and respond to each other in real time. Interactive TV courses are between two or more locations.

Enhanced: Courses are taught on a traditional schedule, but also offer some additional activities using alternative learning experiences to replace some in person attendance.

Having a range of options in how courses are accessed by students has been shown to accommodate different learning styles, allowing students more flexibility to fit a college education into their busy lives.

Prerequisites

A prerequisite is a requirement that a student must meet prior to enrolling in a particular course. For example, if a student wants to take ENGL& 101 , (s)he must have received a “C-” or better in ENGL 095  or placed at the ENGL& 101  level on the placement test. Prerequisites are listed with the individual course descriptions in the catalog and quarterly schedule of classes. If enrolling in a college-level course (numbered 100 or above), it is assumed that the student has appropriate reading, writing, and mathematical skills even though prerequisites may not be listed. These skills are considered successful: completion of READ 090 , ENGL 095 , and MATH 098 , or receiving placement scores above those levels.

Prerequisites for a particular course may be waived with permission of the instructor of that course. Students must obtain an entry code or signature from the instructor to have the prerequisite waived.

Recommended Preparation

Some courses that do not list prerequisites may list requirements that are recommended instead. This information is provided by the instructor as a way to explain the skill level they expect students to have prior to enrolling in a course.

If a student does not meet recommended preparation requirements, she/he will not be stopped from enrolling in the class. However, considering this information carefully before selecting classes is important for student success.

Independent Study

Credit for Independent Study may be permitted under special circumstances. When an instructor agrees to supervise independent study that allows the student to pursue topics above and beyond regular course offerings. Courses are numbered as 290 series courses. An instructor may also agree to supervise an independent study for a regular course offering. A “Course Contract for Independent Study” must be completed by the student and the instructor and approved by the appropriate division chair and Vice President for Instruction.

Special Topics

Special Topics 199 and 299 are regular courses designed to deal with unique subjects or timely topics. These topics may be offered in any discipline, typically on a one-time basis. The purpose of these courses is to provide students with the opportunity to explore specialized subjects within a chosen field of study. Special Topics courses may vary from one to five credit hours. Prerequisites are determined on a course-by-course basis. Credits are variable. Special Topics 199 and 299 courses are not acceptable for fulfilling distribution requirements for any degree. They serve as general electives only.

 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM& 110 - Chemical Concepts with Lab


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in MATH 097  or placement in MATH 098 .

    An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry and the predictive power chemistry provides. Topics include elements; compounds and mixtures; periodic properties of the elements; atomic theory and structure; molecular structure and chemical bonding; chemical notation and nomenclature; mass and molar relations; chemical reactions and the mass and energy changes accompanying them; simple thermodynamics; equilibrium, equilibrium constants and kinetics; properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; properties of acids, bases, and pH; connections between chemistry and daily life.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    2 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies science or lab requirement area B distribution or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe what a Materials Safety Data Sheet is and how it is used
    • Name and use metric units of measure for mass, length, volume and temperature
    • Explain why measured numbers have a limited number of significant(reliable) digits
    • Use conversion factors to change one unit to another and solve basic unit problems
    • Describe atomic structure in terms of electrons, protons and neutrons
    • Tell how element properties relate to their location in the periodic table and tell how metals, nonmetals and metalloids differ
    • Explain how chemical formulas for compounds relate to compound composition
    • Apply the octet rule to predict ion formulas for the representative elements
    • Describe and give examples common of acids, bases, ionic and covalent compounds
    • Explain why compounds have definite composition
    • Describe how to predict shapes for small molecules using the octet rule and VSEPR theory
    • Balance chemical equations by inspection when given formulas for reactants and products
    • Calculate the moles of product expected for a reaction when given an equation and the amounts of reactants
    • Explain why energy changes occur during chemical reactions
    • Describe the entropy changes that accompany a given chemical reaction
    • Describe how reactants and products behave in a process at equilibrium
    • Classify a reaction as exothermic or endothermic based on energy information for the reaction
    • Tell how temperature, concentration, pressure and presence of a catalyst influence the speed of a chemical reaction
    • Use kinetic molecular theory to describe solids, liquids and gases
    • Describe how solutions are formed and the roles of solvent and solute
    • Use common concentration units to figure the amount of solute in a solution
    • Describe how gases dissolve in liquids and the effect of gas pressure on dissolved gases
    • Identify common acids and bases from their formulas
    • Describe the pH scale and relate it to acidic, basic and neutral conditions
    • Determine hydrogen ion concentration from pH values
    • Figure acid or base concentrations using titration data
    • Describe how buffers act to regulate solution pH and pOH and give an example  
       


    Note
    Student may not receive credit for both CHEM& 110 and CHEM& 121 . This course does not meet the chemistry requirement for the Associate in Pre-Nursing DTA or the chemistry admissions requirement for the Associate in Applied Science Nursing degree.
  
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    CHEM& 121 - Introduction to Chemistry with Lab


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in MATH 097  or placement in MATH 098 .

    A survey of general chemical principles, including elements and compounds, atomic structure and periodic properties, chemical reactions, energy, equilibrium and kinetics, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. This course is intended for allied health and natural resources majors, as well as those students pursuing an AA degree. It also serves as the prerequisite for CHEM& 161  for students who have not completed one year of high school chemistry. This course, with CHEM& 131  , constitutes a terminal sequence in chemistry and does not prepare a student for a second year of chemistry.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    2 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies science or lab requirement area B distribution or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Students completing the course will have been instructed in the following topics and procedures, evaluated on their ability to perform the required functions, and earn a course grade based on the evaluation of their ability to do the following:

    • Understand the scientific method and the role of observations and measurements in classifying the physical and chemical properties of matter and in the development of Atomic Theory
    • Understand the quantum mechanical model of the atom and the relationship between electron configuration and chemical periodicity
    • Solve problems involving the stoichiometry of chemical formulas and reactions
    • Understand and apply models of chemical bonding, both ionic and covalent
    • Describe the different types of chemical reactions, including metathesis and oxidation-reduction reactions
    • Describe and explain the properties of the different states of matter and the effects of intermolecular forces of attraction on those properties
    • Describe and explain the physical properties of solutions, including solution stoichiometry
    • Understand and apply concepts of chemical equilibrium, including acid-base equilibria
    • Describe and define the various properties of acids and bases and describe the function and action of buffers


  
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    CHEM& 131 - Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry with Lab


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in CHEM& 121  or instructor permission.

    A continuation of CHEM& 121 . A survey of organic and biochemistry including hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and metabolism. This course does not prepare a student for a second year of chemistry.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    2 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies science or lab requirement area B distribution or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Classify, name, and write formulas for hydrocarbons and their halogen derivatives; describe their physical properties, including trends in boiling point
    • Recognize structural and geometric isomers
    • Predict the products of addition reactions to alkenes, including the formation of addition polymers
    • Classify, name, and write formulas for alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters; describe their physical properties, including trends in boiling point and water solubility
    • Define terms associated with oxidation and reduction; predict the products of the oxidation and/or reduction of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, and carboxylic acids
    • Predict the products of reactions involving the formation and hydrolysis of esters and polyesters
    • Classify, name, and write formulas for amines and amides; describe their physical properties and the reactions involved in the formation of amides and polyamides
    • Recognize the physiological effects of amines and amides, including common alkaloids and analgesics
    • Recognize and classify the products of reactions of aldehydes and ketones with alcohols
    • Understand the origin of optical isomerization
    • Define and know the physical properties of carbohydrates
    • Recognize, classify, and know the biological functions of common mono-, di-, and polysaccharides
    • Describe the biological functions of proteins
    • Recognize and classify amino acids; understand how they are polymerized to form polypeptides; describe the four levels of protein structure and the forces that stabilize them
    • Understand how enzymes function and the factors that affect enzyme-catalyzed reactions
    • Describe the structures and functions of DNA and RNA and the processes of replication, transcription, and translation
    • Describe the effects of mutations on protein structure
    • Understand methods for producing genetically modified organisms
    • Define catabolism and anabolism and explain the roles of the ATP cycle and of oxidizing and reducing agents in these processes
    • Understand the role of mitochondria in the common catabolic pathway
    • Describe the catabolism of glucose, including the functions of glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, and fermentation
    • Describe the metabolic fates of complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, and proteins
    • Understand the physiological effects of uncontrolled diabetes


  
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    CHEM& 161 - General Chemistry with Lab I


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    One year of high school chemistry or CHEM& 121  and concurrent enrollment in MATH& 141  or placement in MATH& 142 .

    For science, engineering and other majors who plan to take a year or more of chemistry courses. Principles of general chemistry including atomic structure and periodic properties, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, and electronic structure. Laboratory work emphasizes the quantitative nature of these principles.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    3 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies science or lab requirement area B distribution or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand the scientific method
    • Use the metric system of units and the appropriate number of significant figures in calculations; perform unit conversions, including those involving density
    • Define and classify matter as elements, compounds, solutions, and heterogeneous mixtures
    • Understand and apply the Laws of Chemical Combination; explain these laws using Atomic Theory
    • Describe the structure of an atom; identify isotopes of an element
    • Understand the structure of the Periodic Table; identity metals, nonmetals, and metalloids and know their properties
    • Identify and know the properties of molecular and ionic compounds; name and write formulas for inorganic compounds
    • Understand and apply the mole concept
    • Determine the chemical composition of a compound using experimental data, including combustion analysis
    • Solve stoichiometry problems, including excess/limiting reactant problems
    • Understand and apply the concept of molar concentration to solution stoichiometry problems
    • Distinguish between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; recognize and classify common acids and bases
    • Write molecular, ionic, and net ionic equations for metathesis reactions
    • Define the terms associated with oxidation/reduction reactions; assign oxidation numbers and balance redox equations using the ion/electron method
    • Understand and apply the activity series of metals and hydrogen
    • Solve problems involving acid/base and redox titrations
    • Define common terms associated with energy, including heat, temperature, internal energy, and enthalpy
    • Understand and apply the First Law of Thermodynamics
    • Solve calorimetry problems using specific heat and heat capacity
    • Recognize thermochemical equations; use Hess’s Law to solve problems involving heats of reaction
    • Understand the wave/particle nature of light and matter
    • Perform calculations involving the wavelength, frequency, and energy of a photon of light
    • Apply the Bohr and quantum mechanical models of the atom
    • Write electronic configurations for atoms and monatomic ions; use these configurations to explain the chemical and physical properties of the elements


  
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    CHEM& 162 - General Chemistry with Lab II


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in both CHEM& 161  and MATH& 141  (or placement in MATH& 142 ).

    A continuation of general chemistry including bonding and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, and acids and bases. Laboratory work includes elementary quantitative analysis.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    4 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Explain the formation of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds
    • Draw Lewis symbols for atoms and monatomic ions
    • Draw Lewis structures and use VSEPR Theory to predict the shapes of molecules and polyatomic ions; assign formal charges and apply the resonance concept
    • Use Valence Bond Theory and hybridization to explain the structures of molecules and polyatomic ions
    • Apply Molecular Orbital Theory to diatomic molecules and ions
    • Describe and explain the properties of gases, liquids, and solids
    • Know and explain gas laws, including the ideal gas law, using Kinetic Molecular Theory; solve problems using these laws
    • Define and identify the different types of intermolecular forces of attraction and use them to explain the physical properties of liquids and molecular solids
    • Interpret phase diagrams
    • Classify crystalline solids; solve problems involving metallic and ionic crystals
    • Understand the role of intermolecular forces of attraction in the solution process
    • Convert between solution concentration units
    • Know the colligative properties of solutions; solve problems involving these properties, including determining the molar mass of a solute
    • Know the factors that affect the rates of chemical reactions; use the Arrhenius equation to relate rate constants and temperature
    • Write rate laws based on experimental data; propose reaction mechanisms based on experimental rate laws
    • Explain how catalysts function
    • Understand the concept of chemical equilibrium; solve problems involving equilibrium constants, including the effect of temperature on equilibrium
    • Use LeChatlier’s Principle to predict the effects of changes on a system in equilibrium
    • Know and apply the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis definitions of acids and bases
    • Apply the basic concepts of equilibrium to acids and bases, including the use of acid/base dissociation constants
    • Understand the pH concept; calculate the pH of a solution of an acid, base, or salt


  
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    CHEM& 163 - General Chemistry with Lab III


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in CHEM& 162  .

    A continuation of general chemistry including equilibrium in aqueous solutions, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, periodic properties of the elements, complexes, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to industrial and organic chemistry. Laboratory work includes qualitative analysis.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    4 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirements for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand the common ion effect and define a buffer; solve problems involving buffers
    • Understand acid-base titrations curves; calculate the pH at any point in a titration and select an appropriate indicator for the titration
    • Solve equilibrium problems involving slightly soluble ionic compounds and complex ions
    • Understand the concept of entropy and the factors that determine the entropy of a system
    • Use the Second Law of Thermodynamics to predict if a process is spontaneous or nonspontaneous; calculate changes in enthalpy, entropy, and free energy
    • Describe how a change in free energy is related to the position of equilibrium and the value of the equilibrium constant for a process; perform calculations involving these concepts
    • Know the terms associated with electrochemical reactions and cells
    • Describe the construction of a voltaic cell and write its cell diagram
    • Calculate cell potential using standard reduction potentials and the Nernst equation
    • Perform calculations involving cell potentials, changes in free energy, and equilibrium constants
    • Describe the construction and chemistry of common batteries and fuel cells
    • Predict the products of reactions carried out in electrolytic cells; apply the laws of electrolysis to calculate the amounts of products formed in these cells
    • Understand and predict periodic trends for the properties of main-group and transition elements
    • Describe the formation of coordination compounds and complex ions; predict the geometries and identify isomers of complexes
    • Use Valence Bond and Crystal Field Theories to explain the properties of coordination compounds and complex ions
    • Describe the different types of radiation and of radioactive decay; balance nuclear equations for natural decays and for artificial transmutations
    • Solve problems involving the half-lives of radioactive decays
    • Understand the health effects of radiation and the medical uses of radioactive isotopes
    • Understand the origins of nuclear energy and perform calculations involving mass defects and nuclear binding energies
    • Describe the components, operation, advantages and disadvantages of fission and fusion reactors
    • Understand basic metallurgical processes and their role in the production of important metals
    • Be familiar with the processes involved in the production of important industrial compounds and fertilizers
    • Classify organic compounds; name and identify isomers of hydrocarbons; recognize important reactions of hydrocarbons
    • Recognize addition and condensations polymers; identify and describe biological polymers


  
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    CHEM& 261 - Organic Chemistry with Lab I


    6 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    CHEM& 163 .

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in CHEM& 162 .

    This course is designed as the first of a three-quarter sequence of organic chemistry for majors in physical and biological sciences and for pre-professional students. Structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of hydrocarbons and their monofunctional derivatives are covered.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    4 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply the fundamental principles of the Lewis approach to molecular structure and bonding, recognize stable structural patterns, and recognize the key relationship between the structure and properties of acids and bases
    • Identify classes of hydrocarbons(alkanes and cycloalkanes), including isomers, describe their chemical and physical properties, and correctly use IUPAC and common nomenclature
    • Correctly apply the principles of stereochemistry(chirality)
    • Examine chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms for functional group transformations involving the preparation of alcohols and alkyl halides
    • Understand and correctly use the mechanisms of Nucleophilic Substitution
    • Identify and classify alkenes (including isomers), describe their chemical and physical properties, use correct common nomenclature, and identify their methods of preparation via E1 and E2 mechanisms


  
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    CHEM& 262 - Organic Chemistry with Lab II


    6 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in CHEM& 261  or instructor permission.

    This course is a continuation of CHEM& 261 . Structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of aldehydes, ketones and aromatic compounds. Grignard synthesis of alcohols. Free radical reactions.

    Theory Hours
    4 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    4 guided practice hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the formation and predict the reactivity of alkenes, alkynes, free radicals, dienes, aromatic compounds, and organometallic compounds
    • Describe the mechanism of the formation and reactions of alkenes, alkynes, free radicals, dienes, aromatic compounds, and organometallic compounds
    • Outline plausible multi-step synthesis of target organic molecules that involve alkenes, alkynes, free radicals, dienes, aromatic compounds, and organometallic compounds
    • Evaluate the relative physical properties of alkenes, alkynes, free radicals, dienes, aromatic compounds, and organometallic compounds
    • Effectively use Instrumental Analysis (IR Spectroscopy, GC) for the elucidation of molecular structure
    • Demonstrate fundamental skills used by the organic chemist to synthesize and characterize molecules in the laboratory
    • Explain reasons for the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of experiments in the organic chemistry laboratory


  
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    CHEM& 263 - Organic Chemistry with Lab III


    3 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in CHEM& 262 .

    This course is a continuation of CHEM& 262  for students desiring three quarters of organic chemistry. Topics include FMO theory, nonclassical carbocations, heterocycles, rearrangements, amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the formation and predict the reactivity of alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids & their derivatives, enols & enolates, and amines
    • Describe the mechanism of the formation and reactions of alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids & their derivatives, enols & enolates, and amines
    • Outline plausible multi-step synthesis of target organic molecules that involve of alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids & their derivatives, enols & enolates, and amines
    • Evaluate the relative physical properties of alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids & their derivatives, enols & enolates, and amines
    • Describe the formation and predict the reactivity of common biomolecules: carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins



College Success

  
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    COLL 075 - Math Lab


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Concurrent enrollment in MATH 060  or MATH 070 .

    This course is designed to enhance a student’s math, reading, speaking and employability skills by providing supplemental instruction for pre-college math classes. Instruction will be contextualized to the student’s chosen educational pathway whenever possible. This supplemental lab course will provide the opportunity for students to accelerate their progress through pre-college math and is highly recommended for students enrolled in MATH 060  or MATH 070  level classes.

    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
  •  

    COLL 101 - College 101


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate placement or instructor permission, to be determined.

    This course is designed to help students explore career options, set meaningful academic and career goals, and create an academic and career plan to achieve their goals. Students will develop essential strategies for literacy, critical thinking, resilience, diverse interaction, and learning that allow success and a sense of belonging in higher education and other complex environments.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.


Commercial Transportation and Maintenance (CDL)

  
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    CTM 101 - Transportation Careers: Commercial Driving


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Place in READ 080  or must have a CASAS score of 220 or higher. Have a valid Washington State driver’s license. Must have/provide: 1) clean/clear DMV 5-year abstract; 2) DOT physical; meet requirements of FMCSR, sections 391.41 and 391.49; 3) obtain valid Commercial Learners Permit (CLP) from Washington State DMV. Concurrent enrollment in CTM 150  and CTM 185  is required. All CTM core courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

    Students are introduced to transportation careers with an emphasis on commercial truck driving, including: classroom instruction in FMCSR rules and regulations; mechanical overview of tractors and trailers; safety; defensive driving; FMCSR log book rules; trip planning; pre-trip inspection procedures; and mastery of the pre-trip requirements for the CDL Class A exam. Additionally, preventive maintenance techniques; completion of inspection reports; daily/monthly logs; loading and unloading of cargo; freight bills, waybills, manifests; and selecting appropriate hazardous cargo placards will be discussed.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate knowledge of proper CDL Pre-trip Inspection procedure
    • Demonstrate CDL written test knowledge for combination vehicles, air brakes, doubles/triples, tankers
    • Demonstrate knowledge of logbook procedures
    • Demonstrate map reading knowledge
    • Demonstrate work ethic needed to operate in trucking industry
    • Demonstrate proper procedures for pre-trip and post-trip inspections
    • Demonstrate proper procedure for completing a DVIR
    • Demonstrate work ethics and leadership skills appropriate to the industry


  
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    CTM 150 - Range Operations and Equipment


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Concurrent enrollment in CTM 101  and CTM 185  or instructor permission.

    Students gain knowledge and skills in the areas including, but not limited to, safety, tractor/trailer equipment, control systems, pre-trip inspections, coupling/uncoupling, straight backing, off-set backing (parallel), 90˚ sight-side backing, and other maneuvers as determined.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    6 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate proper procedures for pre-trip and post-trip inspections
    • Demonstrate safe and proper procedure for coupling/uncoupling
    • Demonstrate safe backing procedures
    • Demonstrate work ethics and leadership skills appropriate to the industry


  
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    CTM 185 - Over the Road Driving


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Concurrent enrollment in CTM 101  and CTM 150  or instructor permission. All CTM core courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

    Students will gain knowledge and skills in the areas including, but not limited to, safety, spatial awareness, visual search, putting the vehicle in motion, shifting gears, cornering, uphill/downhill techniques and stopping; rural driving; hazard perception; and city driving. Extreme driving conditions will be discussed.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    6 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate proper and safe driving techniques
    • Demonstrate proper and safe left and right turns
    • Demonstrate hazard perception knowledge
    • Obtain Class A CDL License with endorsements for doubles/ triples, tankers with no air brake restrictions
    • Demonstrate proper usage of mirrors


  
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    CTM 190 - Log Truck Driving


    3 credits

    Prerequisites
    Current Class A license and instructor permission.

    Students who successfully complete this course will receive a Grays Harbor College log truck driving endorsement. This class provides knowledge and training in logging safety, PPE equipment, scales, WSP common violations, road awareness with full load, proper speeds on logging roads, uphill/downhill/backing practice, turning around, blind corners, safe practice in yards and landings, documentation requirements.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.


Communications

  
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    CMST& 101 - Introduction to Communication


    5 credits

    An overview of the field of communication. Provides theories and practices of interpersonal, small group, intercultural, and public speech communication. Focuses on communication competency in different contexts.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area F requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course, students should be able to:

    • Explain foundational theories of interpersonal, small group, intercultural, and public speech communication
    • Demonstrate behavior that shows attentiveness to others and understanding the impact of attending skills
    • Paraphrase others’ ideas and check for understanding
    • Work cooperatively by conversing and encouraging communication
    • Present ideas while attending to audience and purpose and considering cultural differences
    • Exchange information, thoughts, feelings, and perspectives to multiple audiences through a variety of written, verbal, nonverbal, visual, and symbolic means
    • Use creative and critical thinking processes to create common understandings, present multiple perspectives, and evaluate the effectiveness of one’s own and others’ communication
    • Apply principles of diversity in interpersonal, group, and public communication
    • Recognize one’s own and others’ values, ethics, actions, and perspectives and their potential effects on others
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical need for and value of respecting differences among cultures and perspectives
    • Use technology and other resources to obtain information
    • Communicate responsibly using accurate, truthful, and equitable language and ideas; understand the consequences of irresponsible communication
    • Use writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, and capitalization) effectively
    • Use reading strategies to build understanding


  
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    CMST& 210 - Interpersonal Communication


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Eligible for ENGL& 101  or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 .

    Introduces students to the fundamentals of interpersonal communication theory. Emphasizes key functions of communication, self-concept, perception, conversation skills, relationship development, maintenance, and disengagement, self-disclosure, assertiveness, and conflict management strategies.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area F requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    After completing this class, students should be able to:

    • Gather information from peer-reviewed publications and other print and electronic media sources
    • Analyze personal communication skills, cultural communication phenomena, and scholarly work in the field of communication
    • Compose an analytic paper based on principles of interpersonal communication and evidence from appropriate and credible sources
    • Identify and apply fundamental concepts of interpersonal communication to create and maintain relationships
    • Analyze their role in society and examine how it influences their experiences, values, and choices in the process of communication
    • Identify and distinguish between assertive, passive, and aggressive behavior
    • Distinguish between intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and public communication


  
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    CMST& 220 - Public Speaking


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Eligible for ENGL& 101  or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 .

    Presents the principles of effective oral communication including organization, content development, delivery, and stress management. A functional approach to effective speaking with practical application in informative, impromptu, and persuasive speeches.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area F requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Effectively deliver at least three kinds of speeches
    • Respond critically to peer speeches using the principals of constructive feedback
    • Craft and organize clear, concise, and compelling speeches of different lengths
    • Assume an informed stance of a topic based on understanding personal values, human diversity, multicultural awareness, and social responsibility


  
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    CMST& 230 - Small Group Communication


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Eligible for ENGL& 101  or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 .

    Explores effective communication in small groups. Students examine aspects of group process including leadership, conflict management, decision-making, conformity, and critical thinking. Emphasis is given to practical experience in group discussion, participation, analysis, and process.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area F requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    After completing this class, students should be able to:

    • Describe and distinguish between different types of groups
    • Describe and distinguish between the stages of group development
    • Identify the language, listening, and nonverbal communication skills needed to promote a positive communication climate in a group setting
    • Analyze the influence of culture on group interaction
    • Identify the actions needed to conduct an effective meeting and promote group productivity
    • Analyze the decision-making methods used by a group
    • Identify methods groups can use to critical and creative thinking for problem-solving
    • Recognize how leadership theories explain how groups address their goals
    • Identify and apply different methods for managing conflict within a group


  
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    CMST& 240 - Intercultural Communication


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    ENGL& 101 

    The study of intercultural communication theory, and the development of skills in sending and receiving oral and written messages within a cross-cultural context. Examines how differences in cultural background influence communication patterns in a variety of contexts. Covers selecting a communication style and strategies appropriate to a specific audience and setting.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.


Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 251 - Management Information Systems


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    BA 104  or MATH& 107  or higher, or instructor permission.

    Elements of information processing systems are covered with emphasis on design, development and management of computer-based information systems. Extensive use of online activities will be utilized. The course looks at how a modern organization collects, distributes, organizes and manages information. The approach will be sociotechnical, i.e. both technical and behavioral considerations will be examined.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • To develop an understanding of what information systems are, how they work and their uses within an organization
    • Learn how information systems affect the organizations and its employees
    • Develop an understanding of how information systems can make a firm more competitive and successful
    • View MIS as a multidisciplinary field
    • Develop the skill to Internet tools for communication and information research
    • Work closely and effectively within groups
    • To develop an understanding of what information systems are, how they work and their uses within an organization



Computer Numerical Control

  
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    MT 111 - Intro to CNC


    3 credits

    Introduction to the theory and operation of CNC software machining to include CNC controllers, CNC processing, CNC fundamentals and vocabulary, and programming concepts with interactive simulation software. This course is part of the CNC Machine Technology Program which will lead to a professional technical certificate.

  
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    MT 112 - Intro to MasterCAM


    3 credits

    Introduction to the theory and operation of MasterCAM Software in its application to Computer Numerical Controls (CNC) machining. This course is part of the CNC Machine Technology Program which leads to a professional technical certificate.

  
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    MT 113 - MasterCAM Solids


    3 credits

    Work with 3D solids in MasterCAM software to create files, chamfers, trim, loft, shell, sweep, mirror, revolve, offsets, and pocket tool paths. This course is part of the CNC Machine Technology Program which leads to a professional technical certificate.

  
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    MT 116 - MasterCAM Applications


    3 credits

    Student will design a miniature scale piece of furniture (instructor approval required) that will be milled and assembled for final presentation. This course is part of the CNC Machine Technology Program which will lead to a professional certificate.

  
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    MT 117 - MasterCAM Solidworks


    3 credits

    Introduction to the theory and operation of MasterCAM software and its application to Solidworks and CNC machining. Create tool paths, post codes, generate G-code and determine tool selection. This course is part of the CNC Machine Technology Program which will lead to a professional technical certificate.


Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ& 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 READ 090  or placement in college level reading, or instructor permission.

    A survey of the historical development of the criminal justice system to present-day practices. This course studies the development of the police, courts and correctional agencies in meeting the demands society has placed on them. Students will explore career opportunities at the federal, state and local levels.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Develop an understanding of the criminal justice perspective
    • Develop an understanding of the critical thinking aspect of criminal justice
    • Develop an understanding of criminal justice as a social service agency
    • Develop an understanding of the impact criminal justice has on society
    • Develop an understanding of the basic requirements in the field of justice
    • Develop an understanding of the interactions among government agencies
    • Develop an understanding of the necessary literature in the class setting


  
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    CJUS 104 - The Line Officer Function: Police and Corrections


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 READ 090  or placement in college level reading, or instructor permission.

    An in-depth look at the basic duties and functions of police officers and correctional officers in cities and counties throughout the nation. Students will examine the responsibilities of the police and corrections from violator contact and arrest, through the court process. Discussions will focus on police encounters with the public, and the methods used by correctional officers in their dealing with prisoners. Emphasis will be placed on the impact that police and corrections have on our community today. Vocational program course.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Develop an understanding of police operations and correctional services
    • Develop an understanding of cooperative efforts within the justice system
    • Develop an understanding of the justice process, from arrest to conviction
    • Develop an understanding of the training required of police and corrections
    • Develop an understanding of the necessary literature within the class setting


  
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    CJUS 151 - Drugs and Our Society


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Placement in ENGL 095 .

    This class is designed to give students a basic understanding of all classifications of drugs. Topics to be covered include the biology of drug action, effects of drugs on the body, dependence and treatment, alternatives to drug use, and drugs and the law. Types of drugs discussed will range from prescription drugs, to alcohol, to illegal drugs, and over-the-counter drugs. Same as HPE 151; students may not receive credit for both.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Develop an understanding of the drug problem within the United States
    • Develop an understanding of how drug abuse impacts all individuals
    • Develop an understanding of drug usage characteristics
    • Develop an understanding of the problems associated with drug use
    • Develop an understanding of the criminal justice response to drug use
    • Develop an understanding of the biological effects drugs have on the body
    • Develop an understanding of the necessary literature within the class setting


  
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    CJUS 201 - The Art of Public and Private Investigation


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    CJ& 101  or instructor permission.

    Students will gain an understanding of the need for investigative services and how they impact our present-day society. The investigative techniques used by police, correctional investigators, juvenile officers, probation and parole, state agency investigators, and private investigators will be examined. Students will become aware of sources for information and the scientific aids that are available to assist in case completion. Investigation theories will be examined and students will become familiar with the process of scientific reasoning.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Develop an understanding of critical thinking skills in criminal investigation
    • Develop an understanding of problem solving techniques
    • Develop an understanding of investigative concepts
    • Develop an understanding of training requirements for criminal investigators
    • Develop an understanding of how investigative services impact society
    • Develop an understanding of techniques used by the criminal justice system
    • Develop an understanding of necessary literature in the class setting


  
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    CJUS 258 - Criminal Justice Internship


    1-5 credits

    Prerequisites
    CJ& 101 ,  POLS 102 , or instructor permission.

    Interns must also meet the requirement set forth by the agency selected. On-the-job training experience within a criminal justice agency. Interns work from 55 to 250 hours with or without remuneration.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Develop a first-hand experience through personal observation
    • Develop increased skills within a professional criminal justice organization
    • Develop an understanding of the hiring process
    • Develop an understanding of professional interactions



Diesel Technology

  
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    DT 121 - Introduction to Diesel Technology


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Placement in MATH 060 , READ 080  and ENGL 060 ; and instructor permission.  Must have a valid Washington state driver’s license.

    A theory-lab course to provide an introduction to safe shop work practices, work ethics, basic tool use, and introduction to basic mechanical tasks.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Students will understand safe shop work practices, work ethics, basic tool use, and introduction to basic mechanical tasks. (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use


  
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    DT 122 - Intermediate Diesel Technology


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Completion of DT 121  with a grade of “C” or better and instructor permission.

    A theory-lab course to build upon skills learned in DT 121 . The course promotes work habits and safe work practices. Training increases skills and expands tasks learned in DT 121 . Projects are completed to industry standards.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Students will complete medium difficulty mechanical projects. (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use.


  
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    DT 123 - Advanced Diesel Technology


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Completion of DT 122  with a grade of “C” or better and instructor permission.

    A theory-lab course to build upon skills learned in DT 122 . This course continues to promote work habits and safe work practices. Advanced Diesel Technology projects are completed to industry standards.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Students will complete medium to difficult mechanical projects. (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use.


  
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    DT 221 - Diagnostics, Testing and Repair


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Completion of DT 123  with a grade of “C” or better and instructor permission.

    A theory-lab course to build upon skills learned in DT 121  through DT 123 . Individual projects are assigned that will challenge the student and expand upon the skills learned in DT 121  through DT 123  and introduces diagnostics, testing, and problem solving to the student. Individual projects are completed to industry standards.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • This course provides an opportunity for practical shop application of students’ knowledge and skills acquired by completion DT 121 , DT 122 , and DT 123 . Students are introduced to simulated shop operations for the repair and maintenance of vehicles. Students are also introduced to the use of specialized equipment, tools, and machines used by the diesel mechanic in the modern shop. (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use.


  
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    DT 222 - Advanced Diagnostics, Testing and Repair


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Completion of DT 221  with a grade of “C” or better and instructor permission.

    A theory-lab course to build upon skills learned in DT 121  through DT 221 . This course will see Advanced Individual Projects assigned to students that will emphasize diagnostics, testing, and problem solving by the student and will replicate, as close as possible, real world shop conditions for the student to work in.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • This course is a continuation of the practical shop skills acquired in DT 221 . Extensive practical applications of all aspects of diesel equipment repair are addressed in this course. The use of specialized equipment, tools, machines and techniques is emphasized. (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use.


  
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    DT 223 - Certification and Testing


    16 credits

    Prerequisites
    Completion of DT 222  with a grade of “C” or better and instructor permission.

    A theory-lab course to build upon and confirm the diesel mechanics skills learned in DT 121  through DT 222 . Course covers selected industry certification test requirements, procedures, and standards. Successful students will practice and pass selected ASE certification tests. Testing fees may apply for each certification test. Course includes a written and performance capstone exam to ensure retention of competency in previous Diesel Technology program course topics.

    Theory Hours
    8 theory hours.

    Guided Practice Hours
    16 guided practice hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Students will work to industry standards on all assigned projects (A)
    • Students will demonstrate self-direction and motivational skills (A)
    • Students will demonstrate the abilities to diagnose and resolve a variety of mechanical problems (A)
    • Demonstrate mastery and retention of skills and knowledge from DT 222  through DT 222  (A)
    • Course standards: A4-Competency in the Discipline, B2-Literacy, C2-Critical Thinking, D4-Social and Personal Responsibility, and E1-Information Use



Drywall

  
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    DRY 110 - Modern Drywall Installation


    3 credits

    This course is designed to provide instruction in light commercial and residential drywall installation techniques used in the construction industry.

  
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    DRY 120 - Modern Drywall Texturing & Finishing


    3 credits

    This course is designed to provide instruction in light commercial and residential drywall finishing techniques used in the construction industry.


Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 145 - Fine Arts Curriculum for Young Children


    3 credits

    Teaching methods and curriculum development in art, dramatics and music for children from birth to age eight emphasizing practical skills for providing developmentally appropriate art, dramatic play, puppetry, creative movement, and dramatization experiences. Role of music in social emotional, physical, cognitive, creative and aesthetic development and practical skills for providing developmentally appropriate music experiences.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Select and plan developmentally appropriate music, literature, and creative art activities for young children
    • Connect theory and practice to creative arts themes and designs
       


  
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    ECED 200 - Practicum II


    3 credits

    Prerequisites
    Instructor permission.

    Supervised observation and participation in a single ECE setting five hours per week: applying guidance techniques, planning and leading activities for individuals and small groups, and working cooperatively with staff.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe the characteristics of nurturing relationships built between teachers, children, and administrators
    • Practice ideals of professionalism in work with children, families and peers
    • Recognize cultural responsiveness when observing professionals and programs
    • Identify characteristics and practices associated with administration within early childhood environments
    • Describe NAEYC and Washington State regulations related to licensing and program standards


  
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    ECED 235 - Educating Young Children in a Diverse Society: Diversity


    3 credits

    A look at the development of multiculturalism and diversity within children and its impact on early childhood environments. Practical skills in building an anti-bias classroom.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate understanding of community, group, or organizational membership upon early learners
    • Compare and contrast the relationships between multiculturalism and diversity and develop a plan for addressing systemic bias in the early learning classroom
    • Research, develop, and assess strategies for implementing value systems based on equality and social justice


  
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    ECED 238 - Professionalism


    3 credits

    Understanding professional behavior and awareness of resources in the early education setting, along with reflective teaching and mentoring practices.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Identify various program models as well as teaching practices that may be used within early childhood education settings
    • Describe the role of NAEYC and Washington State standards in relation to how they may be associated with professionalism within early childhood environments. Professional also includes promoting respect and equality for everyone
    • Identify areas of professional development that administrators and teachers may pursue


  
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    ECED& 100 - Child Care Basics


    3 credits

    This course is designed to meet licensing requirements for early learning lead teachers and family home child care providers, STARS 30 hour basics course recognized in the MERIT system. Topics include: child growth/development, cultural competency, community resources, guidance, health/safety/nutrition and professional practice.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

  
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    ECED& 105 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education


    5 credits

    Students will explore the foundations of early childhood education, examine theories defining the field, issues and trends, best practices, and program models. Observe children, professionals, and programs in action.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Explain current theories and ongoing research in early care and education
    • Describe the role of play in early childhood programs
    • Compare early learning program models
    • Explain the importance of developing culturally responsive partnerships with families
    • Identify appropriate guidance techniques used in early care and education settings
    • Describe the observation, assessment, and teaching cycle used to plan curriculum for all young children
    • Apply the professional code of ethics for early care and education to resolve dilemmas
    • Describe major historical figures, advocates, and events shaping today’s early childhood education. Describe major historical figures, advocates, and events shaping todays early childhood education


  
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    ECED& 107 - Health, Safety, and Nutrition


    5 credits

    Students will develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. They will learn to recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting, and available community resources.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe federal and state mandated health, safety, and nutrition practices
    • Identify indicators of illnesses/ infectious diseases and steps to prevent the spread of them
    • Outline safety procedures for providing emergency care and daily care
    • Evaluate program safety policies
    • Describe food programs and practices that support the development of children
    • Create examples of developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive health, safety, and nutrition education materials and activities
    • Describe the responsibilities of mandated reporters
    • Develop strategies for working with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse families in accessing health, nutritional, and dental services


  
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    ECED& 120 - Practicum: Nurturing Relationships


    2 credits

    In an early learning setting students will apply best practice for engaging in nurturing relationships with children. The focus is on keeping children healthy and safe while promoting growth and development.

    Theory Hours
     2 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe the characteristics of nurturing relationships built between teachers and children
    • Practice ideals of professionalism in work with children, families and peers
    • Recognize cultural responsiveness when observing professionals and programs
    • Identify practices that promote health, safety, growth and development of children


  
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    ECED& 132 - Infants and Toddlers Care


    3 credits

    Students will examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Focus will be to study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Discuss developmental milestones from birth to 36 months articulating the influences of individual development, temperament and cultural norms in the context of important, ongoing relationships
    • Design a plan to support reciprocal, culturally sensitive partnerships with families
    • Select positive guidance techniques that are appropriate and effective with infants and toddlers
    • Critique infant and toddler early learning environments, articulating environmental influences on the learning processes of infants and toddlers during authentic play activities
    • Describe a plan for developmentally appropriate, culturally relevant curriculum that supports language, physical, cognitive, creative, social, and emotional development


  
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    ECED& 134 - Family Child Care


    3 credits

    Students will learn the basics of home/family child care program management. Topics include: licensing requirements; business management; relationship building; health, safety, and nutrition; guiding behavior and; promoting growth and development.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe strategies for complying with Family Childcare Minimum Licensing Requirements
    • Describe strategies for meeting the developmental needs and guiding the behavior of all children in multi-age groups
    • Identify strategies for family childcare business management including tax planning and record keeping
    • Create written documents, such as a contract and policy handbook, that facilitate communication between the provider and the families
    • Develop strategies for creating reciprocal, culturally responsive relationships with families
    • Articulate knowledge and skills that define Family Childcare Providers as professionals


  
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    ECED& 139 - Administration of Early Learning Programs


    3 credits

    Students will develop administrative skills required to develop, open, operate, manage, and assess early childhood education and care programs. Focus will be to explore techniques and resources available for Washington State licensing and National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standard compliance.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • Crosswalk program policies and practices with licensing and professional standards
    • Create a plan for appropriate staff, food, equipment, materials and programming for specific age groups and settings
    • Prepare a balanced budget
    • Identify methods for recruiting, hiring, evaluating, supervising, and supporting culturally and linguistically reflective staff
    • Describe a variety of strategies for building relationships with all families
    • Review tools used to evaluate program effectiveness and identify areas for improvements
    • Apply the NAEYC Code of Ethics in resolving an administrative dilemma (case study)


  
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    ECED& 160 - Curriculum Development


    5 credits

    Students will investigate learning theory, program planning, and the tools for curriculum development promoting language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills and growth in your children (birth-age 8). Requires 10 hours of observation time outside of class hours.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Explain major early childhood curriculum theories and current trends such as theme-based, emergent, inquiry based, integrated and project approach
    • Use a variety of resources, including WA State Guidelines, program standards, and National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Developmentally Appropriate Practice principles to plan curriculum
    • Create curriculum which supports children’s language/communication, cognitive social/emotional, fine/gross motor, and creative development
    • Plan developmentally appropriate activities and schedules which promote child growth and learning
    • Observe, document and assess individual and group needs, interests and skills for the purpose of curriculum planning and on-going modifications of plans


  
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    ECED& 170 - Environments for Young Children


    3 credits

    Students will design, evaluate, and improve indoor and outdoor environments to ensure quality learning, nurturing, experiences, and to optimize the development of young children.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Design environments that protect the health and safety of children and adults, providing balance between activities that are indoor and outdoor, quiet and active, and allow for interaction with others as well as time alone
    • Develop environmental strategies for guiding children’s behavior helping them develop prosocial skills and the ability to self-regulate
    • Plan an environment, schedule, routine, and activates that meet the needs of learners ages zero to 8, promoting growth across all domains and in all disciplines
    • Describe strategies to achieve compliance with Washington Administrative Code for licensed child care and/or other state/federal regulations pertinent to early learning environments
    • Programming that are welcoming to families and provide opportunities for all to participate
    • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of early learning environments serving differing age groups (ex. infant, toddler, school age)


  
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    ECED& 180 - Language and Literacy Development


    3 credits

    Students will develop teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development at each development stage (birth - age 8) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Explain the continuum of language acquisition and early literacy skills
    • Develop evidence-based, appropriate environments and opportunities that support children’s emergent language and literacy skills
    • Describe strategies for responding to children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse
    • Develop ways to facilitate family and child interactions as primary contexts for heritage language and English development
    • Analyze images of culture and individual abilities reflected in children’s literature and other learning materials
    • Utilize developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive assessment practices for documenting the growth of language and literacy skills


  
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    ECED& 190 - Observation and Assessment


    3 credits

    Students will collect and record observations of and assessment data in order to plan for and support the child, the family, the group, and the community. Students will practice reflection techniques, summarize conclusions, and communicate findings.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe reasons for collecting observation and assessment data
    • Identify indicators of growth, development, learning and social behaviors in all children
    • Identify techniques for avoiding bias, judgments, and assumptions in observations
    • Collect factual, descriptive data using a variety of assessment tools and strategies
    • Document and analyze assessment data for use in planning curriculum for individual and groups of children


  
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    EDUC& 115 - Child Development


    5 credits

    Students will focus on how to build a functional understanding of the foundation of child development, prenatal to adolescence. They will observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross cultural and global perspectives.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Discuss prominent child development research and theories guiding parenting and care giver’s practices
    • Describe the developmental sequence from conception through early adolescence in all domains
    • Analyze critical stages of brain development as influencers of child development
    • Examine techniques to conduct and document observations of children as a means to assess and communicate growth and development
    • Explain individual differences in development
    • Identify how family, caregivers, teachers, community, culture, and trauma influence development
    • Outline community resources to support children’s and families’ development


  
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    EDUC& 130 - Guiding Behavior


    3 credits

    Students will examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Focus will be on how to develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours. Requires 5 hours of observation time outside of class hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Identify developmentally appropriate individual and group behaviors of children
    • Compare at least three approaches to guiding behavior
    • Recognize positive, respectful, culturally responsive approaches to guidance
    • Plan environment supportive of children’s development with focus on attachment, self-help, relationships, and executive function
    • Articulate strategies to promote social/emotional competence and positive sense of self


  
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    EDUC& 136 - School Age Care


    3 credits

    Students will develop skills to provide developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant activities and care, specifically: preparing the environment, implementing curriculum, building relationships, guiding academic/social skill development, and community outreach.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe the physical, cognitive, social and emotional stages of children ages 5-12
    • Develop a plan to create reciprocal and culturally sensitive relationships with children and families
    • Analyze the effectiveness of an environment and recommend changes that are culturally retentive, developmentally appropriate, and conducive to positive social interactions
    • Identify guidance strategies that promote cognitive and social growth in the context of school age care environment
    • Describe state and local school age care regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition and safety
    • Describe strategies supporting curriculum that is developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive
    • Identify community resources supporting school age care/youth development program personnel


  
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    EDUC& 150 - Child, Family, and Community


    3 credits

    Students will learn how to integrate the family and community contexts in which a child develops. The students will learn how to explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Evaluate and describe the cultural influences, social issues, changes and transitions that affect children, families, schools and communities
    • Examine the concept of family, school, peers, media and community as socialization agents
    • Analyze strategies that empower families to establish and maintain collaborative relationships to support the growth and development of children
    • Identify how one’s own family history and life experiences may impact relationships with children and families
    • Identify community services and agencies that support the needs of children and families and establish resource and referral systems for parents and educators


  
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    EDUC& 203 - The Exceptional Child


    3 credits

    Examines the educational, social, and developmental patterns of children and youth aged 0-21 years with exceptionalities. Students explore the impact of exceptionalities on children, their families and on their futures. Includes information about federal and state legislation and programs designed for children with special needs.

    Theory Hours
    3 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate knowledge of young children with a variety of special needs within early learning settings 
    • Document a basic understanding of the types of disabilities and special needs that may impact young children 
    • Document knowledge of the ADA, IDEA, and laws requiring education to be provided for children in the least restrictive setting 
    • Demonstrate understanding of the concept of inclusion and the benefits for children with and without special needs 
    • Identify creative methods to adapt curriculum to include children with special needs in the typical classroom environment 
    • Provide evidence of strategies to promote empathy and understanding between children with and without special needs 
    • Demonstrate beginning skills in participating in multidisciplinary teams that enhance children’s learning and development across education and social systems
    • Document understanding of red flags in children’s development that may indicate a need for further assessment and describe supportive strategies to discuss concerns with parents



Earth Science

  
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    EARTH 102 - Earth Science


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 .

    Prerequisites
    MATH 097  or placement in MATH 098 .

    This course provides an introduction to the Earth and the processes that shape our planet. A major theme of the course is how different aspects of the Earth system interact with each other. Selected topics in four basic areas: astronomy, oceanography, meteorology, and geology, and their relation and interaction with the Earth system will be explored.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies science distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • To develop critical thinking skills and to expose students to the scientific process and the scientific method
    • To help provide students the skills needed to continue learning throughout their lives
    • To introduce student to the basic concepts of the terrestrial environment and the interactions of the various aspects of the Earth system
    • To develop an awareness and appreciation of our natural surroundings



Economics

  
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    ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    MATH 097  or placement in MATH& 107  or higher.

    This course is designed to introduce economics and the economic approach to the problems created by scarcity. Specifically, the course will be “economics for non-majors: fundamental concepts of economic analysis with application to contemporary problems.” The student should learn what a market system is and how it has come to be the predominate economic system.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies social science distribution area B requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Identify the benefits and costs of market trade
    • Describe the concepts of resources and wants, and relate them to Scarcity and Opportunity Costs
    • Understand and describe the concepts and measurement of gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation
    • Understand and describe the difference between business cycles and economic growth and the factors that contribute to each
    • Describe the concepts of Comparative Advantage, balance of payments and its components, and the determinants of exchange rates


  
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    ECON& 201 - Micro Economics


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ECON& 202  

    Prerequisites
    MATH 060 , READ 080 , or instructor permission.

    An introduction to microeconomics. A study of the decision-making processes of individual economic units including businesses and consumers. Basic theoretical tools are applied to problems of current interest.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies social science distribution area B requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Describe and apply principles of Supply and Demand analysis to market situations
    • Calculate how firms maximize profits under variety of market structures
    • Describe and apply microeconomic principles to current issues of healthcare, agriculture, global trade, and labor markets
    • Describe and analyze the decision-making of the business firm regarding input choices , including labor, materials, and capital
    • Describe and apply methods of present-value analysis as a tool for investment decisions


  
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    ECON& 202 - Macro Economics


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    MATH 060 READ 080 , or instructor permission.

    A macroeconomic study of the U.S. economy as a system for solving the fundamental problems of how a society uses its material resources. Emphasis is given to national income, inflation, unemployment, international trade, business cycles, and the monetary system.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies social science distribution area B requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Explain the fundamental concepts of market economics
    • Understand and describe the concepts and methods of macroeconomic measurements
    • Describe and explain the roles of international trading arrangements
    • Describe and critique the tools of fiscal and monetary policy
    • Ability to apply economic reasoning to current events



Education

  
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    EDUC& 201 - Introduction/Orientation to Teaching


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 READ 090  or placement in college level reading, or instructor permission.

    Designed as a course for the student interested in a teaching career. Examines the qualities of good teachers, basic teaching skills, the rewards and responsibilities of teaching, the history and philosophy of teaching, and current innovations in teaching.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement of the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Identify the professional roles, skills, and educational requirements of teachers
    • Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical principles and research in learning, motivation, and development and their implications for educational practice
    • Demonstrate understanding of the development of the education systems in the United States (history of education, law of education, finance of education, current issues)
    • Demonstrate understanding and application of curricula, standards, and assessment


  
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    EDUC& 202 - Education Practicum


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    EDUC& 201  or instructor permission, and successful completion of a national criminal background check.

    This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to learn about schools and teachers. It provides early field experience and related seminar discussions. Observation hours are flexible, but students should be available for periodic seminars.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement of the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Report and reflect upon classroom observations
    • Recognize and analyze methods of instruction, elements of the classroom environment, components of lesson plans, classroom management techniques, and discipline methods
    • Reflect on personal strengths and deficiencies as future teachers


  
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    EDUC& 205 - Introduction to Education with Field Experience


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 , or instructor permission.

    This course is for students interested in a teaching career and includes preparation for professional competencies and certification in Washington State. It is an exploration of teaching in the K-12 system of education of America and details the teaching and learning purpose and process through historical perspectives, current issues, and reform.

    Theory Hours
    The course includes 33 hours of field experience.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement of the AA degree.


English

  
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    ENGL 060 - English Language Study


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    BTECH 100  or BTECH 101  or concurrent enrollment.

    Prerequisites
    Placement in ENGL 060 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 060 prepares students for ENGL 095 . The class develops writing/sentence skills necessary for both everyday writing and subsequent college writing. Students will engage in a writing process to produce compositions that demonstrate audience awareness and use appropriate writing conventions.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completing English 60, students will be able to:

    • Identify main ideas and analyze texts
    • Create clear writing using a structured drafting and peer review process
    • Apply appropriate English conventions
    • Demonstrate audience awareness


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ENGL 095 - Writing Fundamentals


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Placement in ENGL 095, or a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 060 , or a grade of Pass in Trans English I, or instructor permission.

    ENGL 095 prepares students for ENGL& 101 . The class will focus on strategies for reading and thinking critically to write logically developed college-level texts. Students will engage in a writing process to produce compositions that demonstrate audience awareness and use appropriate writing conventions.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completing English 95, students will be able to:

    • Develop and use strategies to think and read critically (print, media, data, etc.) as part of a composing process
    • Engage and reflect upon a composing process, that includes inventing, drafting, participating in a feedback process, revising, and editing
    • Demonstrate audience awareness by composing coherent texts using appropriate organizational strategies
    • Support claims using appropriate evidence and correctly attribute evidence that comes from sources


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ENGL 100L - Writing Lab


    2 credits

    Corequisites
    Recommended Co-enrollment: ENGL 060 , ENGL 095 , ENGL& 101 , ENGL& 102 , ENGL 150 , or ENGL& 235 .

    ENGL 100L is a lab course that supports students enrolled in writing intensive courses such as ENGL 060 , ENGL 095 , ENGL& 101 , ENGL& 102 ,  and ENGL& 235 . Students develop awareness of their own writing habits and learn strategies for writing effectively in college.

    Guided Practice Hours
    4 guided practice hours.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Employ basic reading and writing skills
      • English grammar, punctuation, and spelling
      • Vocabulary and diction
      • Structural components of the sentence, paragraph, and essay
      • Style, including applicable citation styles (e.g. MLA, APA, etc.)
    • Identify and employ specific reading and writing techniques
      • Recursive reading techniques
      • Reading with purpose
      • Prewriting, drafting, and revision
      • Valid, ethical research methods
    • Achieve success as a student
      • Understanding and prioritizing course assignments
      • Time management skills
      • Student-instructor communication
      • Note-taking study skills


    Note
    May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ENGL 150 - Vocational/Technical and Business Writing


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Competency in basic computer operation or concurrent enrollment in BTECH 100 .

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate English placement score or a grade of “C-” or better in ENGL 095 .

    This course is designed for both vocational/technical and business students. It emphasizes written and oral communication required in the world of work. Major topics include business letters and memorandums, formal and informal reports, computer graphics, basic principles of technical writing, and oral presentations.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Vocational Program Course
    Vocational program course.

    AA General Elective
    May be used as a general elective in the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Using technology and other resources to obtain information
    • Analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating ideas from sources
    • Developing ideas into logically crafted claims
    • Supporting claims with valid, specific evidence
    • Summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting source information appropriately to support ideas
    • Organizing, integrating, and documenting research ethically
    • Focusing development of ideas and details using appropriate structure
    • Developing and maintaining a consistent, appropriate tone
    • Offering and accepting feedback about writing for ideas, voice, style, fluency
    • Writing in a variety of forms and adapting form for the purpose/situation
    • Revising writing for ideas, purpose, development and structure
    • Editing writing for precision: sentence structure, grammar, spelling, punctuation


  
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    ENGL 208 - Survey of British Literature: Origin to 1800


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    A history of British literature covering the Anglo-Saxon period to Nineteenth Century with emphasis upon the reactions of literature to the social and political movements and some study of literary forms. Recommended as an introduction to advanced courses in English literature.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Experience literature in all four genres
    • Explore overriding themes in literature
    • Comprehend important ideas and details from texts
    • Recognize cultural and historical influences on the world’s various literatures
    • Analyze and synthesize ideas from texts for a variety of purposes
    • Think critically about readings, and about one’s own responses
    • Understand the structural and technical formal elements of literature
    • Engage in logical, evidence-backed discussion of literature
    • Write for a variety of purposes, including to analyze and critique
    • Take part in productive and effective group discussions and problem-solving sessions


  
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    ENGL 209 - Survey of British Literature: 1800 to Present


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    A history of British literature covering the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries and with emphasis on the reactions of literature to the social and political movements and some study of literary forms. Recommended as an introduction to advanced courses in English literature.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Experience literature in all four genres
    • Explore overriding themes in literature
    • Comprehend important ideas and details from texts
    • Recognize cultural and historical influences on the world’s various literatures
    • Analyze and synthesize ideas from texts for a variety of purposes
    • Think critically about readings, and about one’s own responses
    • Understand the structural and technical formal elements of literature
    • Engage in logical, evidence-backed discussion of literature
    • Write for a variety of purposes, including to analyze and critique
    • Take part in productive and effective group discussions and problem-solving sessions


  
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    ENGL 233 - Survey of Children’s Literature


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    Survey of Children’s Literature covers classic and contemporary literary selections designed for readers from pre-kindergarten through 8th grade. Books will be explored primarily for their content, but the course will also include discussion of the books’ use of both literary and visual-art form.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate understanding of the form, content, and context of literature written for children
      • comprehending the complex characters, themes and ideas in the texts
      • recognizing cultural and historical influences on examples of children’s literature
      • understanding the structural and technical formal elements of the literature
    • Craft meaningful responses to literature from a wide variety of authors and artists
      • engaging in logical, evidence-backed discussion of the meaning and art of the texts
      • analyzing and synthesizing ideas from the texts for a variety of purposes
      • thinking critically about the texts, and about one’s own responses
    • Use the writing process to communicate effectively about the literature
      • writing critical and analytical responses to the texts in one’s own, appropriate voice
      • writing clearly and thoughtfully about the meaning and art of the literature
      • writing for a variety of purposes, including to analyze, critique, and justify


  
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    ENGL 241 - Fiction Writing


    2 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 .

    This course emphasizes the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of the short story. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analysis of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. Students are expected to submit original manuscripts for workshop critique during the course of the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of fiction
    • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
    • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft short stories
    • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
    • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision
    • Revising short stories to enhance structure and technique
    • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
    • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency


  
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    ENGL 242 - Poetry Writing


    2 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 .

    This course emphasizes the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of poetry. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analysis of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. Students are expected to write a variety of poetic exercises, as well as submit original manuscripts for workshop critique, during the course of the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of poetry
    • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
    • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft poems
    • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
    • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision
    • Revising poems to enhance structure and technique
    • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
    • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency


  
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    ENGL 243 - Playwriting


    2 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 .

    This course emphasizes the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of 10-minute and one-act plays. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analysis of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. Additionally, the collaborative nature of playwriting, as compared to writing fiction or poetry, will be addressed; a play is not complete until the writer has involved others in the creative process. The student is expected to submit original manuscripts during the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective credit for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of dramatic form
    • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
    • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft plays
    • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
    • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision
    • Revising plays to enhance structure and technique
    • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
    • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency


  
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    ENGL 246 - Queer Literature


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    ENGL& 101  recommended.

    Queer Literature offers an introduction to queer literature and queer theory as it applies to literature. Works, to include novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and graphic novels, by and about queer people will be studied through a queer lens. Students will practice in-depth analyses of the texts in order to create meaning. While the emphasis will be primarily on the queer, it is impossible to effectively discuss queer texts without discussing the many intersections that they encompass.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree. Course readings reflect our diverse national experience.

  
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    ENGL 252 - Survey of World Literature


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    Survey of World Literature covers literary selections from a wide variety of the world’s cultures. Specifically, it addresses stories, poems and plays from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East. It also covers literary genre, critical methodologies, research, and critical thinking.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Comprehending important ideas and details from texts                                                                         
    • Recognizing cultural and historical influences on the world’s various literatures          
    • Analyzing and synthesizing ideas from texts for a variety of purposes                                              
    • Thinking critically about readings and about one’s own responses                                   
    • Understanding the structural and technical formal elements of literature                      
    • Engaging in logical, evidence-backed discussion of literature                                               
    • Communicating critical and analytical responses to texts in one’s own, appropriate voice       
    • Writing for a variety of purposes, including to analyze, critique, and justify                   
    • Taking part in productive and effective group discussions and problem-solving sessions


  
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    ENGL 275 - Gender in Literature


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    This introductory course deals with the role of gender in literature. The specific topic/theme of the course varies from quarter to quarter. Students will analyze, discuss, and write about selected literary works, highlighting a variety of themes, styles, and perspectives.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate understanding of selected literary texts related to gender and the contexts of these texts
    • Demonstrate understanding of selected texts in feminist and gender theory
    • Write critically and analytically about literary and theoretical texts related to gender


  
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    ENGL 281 - Fiction Writing II


    2 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 241 .

    English 281 is a continuation of ENGL 241 , emphasizing the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of short works of fiction. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analyses of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. The student is expected to submit original manuscripts during the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand and employ elements of fiction form and content
      • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of fiction form
      • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
    • Use the steps in the writing process to craft effective stories
      • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft stories
      • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision
      • Revising stories to enhance structure and technique
      • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Use collaborative critical tools to benefit classmates in their writing
      • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
      • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency


  
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    ENGL 282 - Poetry Writing II


    2 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 242 .

    English 282 is a continuation of ENGL 242 , emphasizing the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of poetry. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analyses of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. The student is expected to submit original manuscripts during the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand and employ elements of poetic form and content
      • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of poetry
      • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
      • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Use the steps in the writing process to craft effective poetry
      • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft poems
      • Revising poems to enhance structure and technique
    • Use collaborative critical tools to benefit classmates in their poetry writing
      • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
      • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision


  
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    ENGL 283 - Playwriting II


    2 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 243 

    English 283 is a continuation of ENGL 243 , emphasizing the various concerns surrounding the understanding and creation of the one-act play. Topics addressed in the course include the processes of drafting and revision, analyses of literary style and technique, and methods of offering and accepting constructive criticism. Additionally, the collaborative nature of playwriting will be addressed: a play is not complete until the writer has involved others in the creative process. The student is expected to submit original manuscripts during the quarter.

    Theory Hours
    2 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand and employ elements of dramatic form and content
      • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of dramatic form
      • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
    • Use the steps in the writing process to craft effective plays
      • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured draft plays
      • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision
      • Revising plays to enhance structure and technique
      • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Use collaborative critical tools to benefit classmates in their playwriting
      • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
      • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency


  
  •  

    ENGL& 101 - English Composition I


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Placement in ENGL& 101, or a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 095 , or instructor permission.

    ENGL& 101 covers rhetorical principles and the development of evidence-backed expository and argumentative texts. Students will engage in a writing process to produce compositions that demonstrate audience awareness and use appropriate writing conventions.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completing English 101, students will be able to:

    • Read and think critically about texts as part of a composing process
    • Use rhetorical knowledge (audience, purpose, etc.) and make conscious rhetorical choices to analyze and compose texts
    • Identify information needs and locate, analyze, critically evaluate, integrate, and appropriately attribute information sources
    • Engage and reflect upon a composing process, that includes inventing, drafting, participating in a feedback process, revising, and editing


    Note
    Satisfies writing skills requirement for the AA degree.
  
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    ENGL& 102 - English Composition II


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    ENGL& 102 develops reading, writing, and critical thinking skills at the advanced level. Students will use a complete research process to find, analyze, evaluate and integrate information from texts to compose evidence-backed arguments that demonstrate audience awareness using appropriate writing conventions and academic source documentation.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completing English 102, students will be able to:

    • Conduct an inquiry-based research process
    • Analyze, synthesize, evaluate, interpret and integrate information from multiple credible sources
    • Produce evidence-backed arguments that demonstrate audience awareness
    • Document research using an appropriate academic format
    • Engage and reflect upon a composing process, that includes inventing, drafting, participating in a feedback process, revising, and editing


    Note
    Satisfies writing skills requirement for the AA degree.
  
  •  

    ENGL& 111 - Introduction to Literature


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Grade of “C-” or better in ENGL 095  or placement in ENGL& 101 .

    Prerequisites
    College-level reading or co-enrollment in READ 090 .  

    This course is a general introduction to literature and is designed to be accessible to all students. Course readings will be chosen from one or more of the following genres: fiction, poetry, essays, and drama. Topics will vary by quarter and instructor.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Demonstrate understanding of literal and inferential meaning in literature
    • Demonstrate knowledge of literary concepts by identifying and describing the formal elements, techniques, genres, and cultural/historical context of literary works
    • Write analytically about literature, and support analysis and interpretation of literary texts by locating, using and citing relevant textual and/or contextual evidence
    • Explain how literary genres, trends, and themes are elements of cultural history


  
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    ENGL& 220 - Introduction to Shakespeare


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    An introduction to the comedies, the histories and the tragedies, this course emphasizes development of the analytical skills necessary to read, write, speak, and think critically about the meaning and dramatic effect of Shakespeare’s plays. Additionally, attention is given to understanding the plays within the context of early modern history and culture.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Comprehending the complex characters, themes and ideas in Shakespeare’s plays
    • Recognizing cultural and historical influences on Shakespeare’s work
    • Analyzing and synthesizing ideas from the plays for a variety of purposes
    • Thinking critically about the plays and about one’s own responses
    • Understanding the thematic significance of the plays
    • Understanding the structural and technical formal elements of the plays
    • Engaging in logical, evidence-backed discussion of the meaning and art of the plays
    • Communicating critical and analytical responses to plays in one’s own, appropriate voice
    • Writing clearly and thoughtfully about the meaning and art of the plays
    • Writing for a variety of purposes, including to analyze, critique, and justify
    • Taking part in productive and effective group discussions and problem-solving session


  
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    ENGL& 235 - Technical Writing


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Competency in basic computer operation or concurrent enrollment in BTECH 100 .

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    This course emphasizes techniques of technical writing and the preparation of informal and formal technical reports commonly found in vocational, technical, and business environments.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understanding and applying the principles of scientific inquiry: procedures, vocabulary, and concepts
    • Understanding and applying the process of conceptualizing, proposing, and conducting quantitative research
    • Understanding and applying methodologies used in quantitative research
    • Selecting, narrowing, and refining research questions and hypotheses
    • Conducting literature reviews: reading, understanding, critiquing, and using peer-evaluated quantitative studies
    • Creating research methodologies: research design, description of the population and rationale for sampling or data collection, variables as applicable, hypotheses or research questions, and data collection and analysis


    Note
    Satisfies writing skills requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.
  
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    ENGL& 236 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    5 credits

    Recommended Preparation
    Placement in ENGL& 101  or a C or better in ENGL 095 .

    Experimental creative writing workshop focused on acquiring new skills. Instruction in literary devices and narrative techniques. Individualized, self-directed learning in virtually any written genres of the student’s choice, with an emphasis on identification and imitation of genre-specific features.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies specified elective requirement for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Understand and employ elements of form and content in both prose and verse
      • Understanding and manipulating the major structural elements of prose and verse
      • Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of imaginative writing
      • Observing and employing the rules of standard English usage
    • Use the steps in the writing process to craft effective essays, stories and poems
      • Developing initial ideas into coherent, structured drafts
      • Revising to enhance structure and technique
    • Use collaborative critical tools to benefit classmates in their writing
      • Reading the work of others in order to understand and evaluate
      • Offering constructive feedback about idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Accepting feedback about writing for idea, voice, style, fluency
      • Considering others’ feedback and using appropriate tools for revision


  
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    ENGL& 244 - Introduction to American Literature


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    A grade of “C-” or better in ENGL& 101 .

    Course readings reflect our diverse national experience during the past two centuries. Authors are selected to highlight peculiarly American themes, forms and cultural conflicts. Fiction, poetry, drama and nonfiction prose are variously emphasized.

    Theory Hours
    5 theory hours.

    AA Specified Elective
    Satisfies humanities distribution area D requirement or specified elective for the AA degree.

    Course Outcomes
    • Developing an appreciation for the contributions of a wide variety of writers to the American literary canon
    • Improving analytical and interpretive skills
    • Refining critical, analytical, and argumentative writing skills
    • Placing American literature in theoretical and historical contexts
    • Engaging in dialogues about American literature
    • Developing an appreciation for diverse cultures



English Language Acquisition

  
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    ELA 040 - English Language Acquisition - Reading I


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score.

    This is course is designed for non-native English speakers who want to improve their basic reading skills and who have very little knowledge of English. The class will emphasize reading skills needed to communicate more effectively in everyday life. Basic math concepts, including reading math texts and word problems, will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Use appropriate basic reading strategies
      • Use critical thinking skills to interpret a variety of basic texts
      • Apply basic reading strategies to math texts and word problems
    • Build basic everyday vocabulary
      • Improve literacy
    • Show comprehension of basic types of texts
      • Demonstrated knowledge of how to use technology to enhance reading
      • Be able to determine what a variety of texts state explicitly


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 041 - English Language Acquisition - Writing I


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score.

    This is course is designed for non-native English speakers, with little or no English language background, who want to improve their writing with a goal to enhance English language skills. The class will emphasize basic writing skills needed to communicate more effectively in everyday life. Basic math concepts, as they relate to effective written communication, will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course students will:

    • Demonstrate a command of basic Standard English language conventions
      • Be able to use the writing process to produce a complete sentences and short paragraphs
      • Use critical thinking skills to apply basic editing and revision skills
      • Apply writing skills to create and solve math problems
      • Demonstrate knowledge of how to use technology to enhance writing
    • Use everyday vocabulary and basic parts of speech to communicate effectively
      • Interact and collaborate with others


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 042 - English Language Acquisition - Speaking & Listening I


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score.

    This course is designed for students with very limited knowledge of the English language. Emphasis is placed on improving a student’s ability to listen with understanding and communicate verbally. Course content includes the vocabulary and math needed to develop the foundational skills needed to move forward to further coursework.

    Course Outcomes
    Students who successfully complete this course will:

    • Prepare for and participate in basic conversations
      • Demonstrate a basic command of formal English
      • Be able to present basic information
      • Determine the key ideas of a speaker
      • Be able to communicate basic number and math concepts verbally
    • Build basic everyday vocabulary
      • Use critical thinking skills to apply appropriate strategies to clarify and check for understanding
      • Interact and collaborate with others


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 045 - English Language Acquisition - Reading II


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 040 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is a continuation of content taught in Reading I and will continue to contextualize curriculum for workforce skills. The class will emphasize reading skills needed to communicate more effectively and begin to explore a pathway to further education or employability. Reading strategies that increase understanding of fundamental math concepts will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Show comprehension of a variety of college/career-related texts
    • Develop vocabulary to improve reading skills
    • Apply reading strategies to improve comprehension of texts


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 046 - English Language Acquisition - Writing II


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score or a P grade in ELA 041 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is a continuation of basic writing skill development started in ELA 041 . It will work to further develop writing skills with contextualized content designed for English Language Learners. The class will emphasize writing skills needed to communicate more effectively in the worlds of work, college and everyday life. Knowledge of how to appropriately communicate math concepts, in writing, will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Produce clear paragraphs
    • Demonstrate a command of standard English language conventions, including grammar, vocabulary, and sentence structure, as applicable to the appropriate level


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 047 - English Language Acquisition - Speaking & Listening II


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 042 , or instructor permission.

    The course is a continuation of speaking and listening skill development designed for English Language Learners. Contextualized content will provide learning opportunities for a student to improve their speaking and listening skills with a goal to develop the skills needed to communicate more effectively within a college setting, job, or personal life. The class will also include content on how to understand basic math concepts often communicated verbally.

    Course Outcomes
    Students who successfully complete this course will:

    • Communicate verbally in a variety of situations
    • Listen actively for understanding


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 082 - English Language Acquisition - Reading IV


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 040  or ELA 045 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is designed for non-native English speakers who have some reading skills in English and want to improve their current knowledge. The class will emphasize reading skills needed to move forward on a pathway to further education or employability. Reading strategies that increase understanding of fundamental math concepts will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Show comprehension of a variety of college/career-related texts
    • Develop vocabulary to improve reading skills
    • Apply reading strategies to improve comprehension of texts


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
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    ELA 083 - English Language Acquisition - Reading V


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 082 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is a continuation of coursework designed to provide an English Language Learner with the opportunity to improve their reading skills to the level needed to pursue a path to further education or employability. Reading strategies that increase understanding of math concepts required in the workforce will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Show comprehension of a variety of college/career-related texts
    • Develop vocabulary to improve reading skills
    • Apply reading strategies to improve comprehension of texts


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
  •  

    ELA 084 - English Language Acquisition - Writing IV


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 041  or ELA 046 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is designed for non-native English speakers, who have some knowledge of English, and want to enhance their writing skills to improve their opportunities for further education and employability. The class will emphasize writing skills needed to communicate more effectively in the worlds of work, college and everyday life. Knowledge of how to appropriately communicate math concepts, in writing, will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Produce clear paragraphs
    • Demonstrate a command of standard English language conventions, including grammar, vocabulary, and sentence structure, as applicable to the appropriate level


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
  •  

    ELA 085 - English Language Acquisition - Writing V


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 084 , or instructor permission.

    This is course is a continuation, for English Language Learners, along a path to opportunities for further education and employability. The class will emphasize writing skills needed to communicate more effectively with a focus on workforce preparation activities. Knowledge of how to appropriately communicate math concepts, in writing, will also be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    • Produce clear paragraphs
    • Demonstrate a command of standard English language conventions, including grammar, vocabulary, and sentence structure, as applicable to the appropriate level


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
  
  •  

    ELA 086 - English Language Acquisition - Speaking & Listening IV


    5 credits

    Prerequisites
    Appropriate CASAS placement score, a P grade in ELA 042  or ELA 047 , or instructor permission.

    The course is designed for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking and listening skills with a goal to continue their education or improve employability. The class will emphasize skills needed to communicate more effectively within a college setting, job, or personal life. The class will also include content on how to understand basic math concepts often communicated verbally.

    Course Outcomes
    Students who successfully complete this course will:

    • Communicate verbally in a variety of situations
    • Listen actively for understanding


    Note
    This course does not meet any degree requirements.
 

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